News on Bladder and Kidney Problems

Bladder problems encompass a wide range of disorders, some of which cause pain, urinary incontinence or other complications that affect quality of life.  Problems in the urinary system can be caused by aging, illness or injury.  As a person gets older, changes in the kidneys’ structure cause them to lose some of their ability to remove wastes from the blood.  Also, the muscles in the ureters, bladder and urethra tend to lose some of their strength.  Urinary infections often occur because the bladder muscles do not tighten enough to empty the bladder completely.  A decrease in the strength of the muscles of the sphincters and the pelvis can cause incontinence (unwanted leakage of urine).

Illness or injury can also prevent the kidneys from filtering the blood completely or block the passage of urine.  The main cause of impaired kidney (renal) function is diabetes. It can lead to acute, chronic or end-stage renal failure.  Other renal conditions include kidney infections, kidney stones, nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and polycystic kidney disease.
 

01/28/2011 - News

Diet Soda May Prevent Some Kidney Stones

Kidney stones from when the urine contains more crystal-forming substances, such as calcium, uric acid, and oxalate, than the body can dilute with the available fluid. Most kidney stones contain a combination of calcium and oxalate. According to new research published in the June issue of the Journal of Urology, drinking diet soda may present the most common type of kidney stones. Read more

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03/31/2010 - News

Study Finds No Difference in Life Span for Kidney Donors

A major study of kidney donors published this month in the Journal of the American Medical Association provides strong evidence that kidney donors live just as long as people with two kidneys. Although previous studies involving relative small numbers of kidney donors suggested that living donation is safe for donors, this is the largest study of its kind to date. Read more

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01/29/2010 - News
Orange juice to stop recurrent kidney stones

Orange juice to stop recurrent kidney stones

Orange juice does a better job than other citrus juices in keeping kidney stones away. Kidney stones develop when minerals and other substances in urine bind together and grow into a deposit. It's an extremely painful condition and one that tends to recur. Dietary changes can help stop kidney stones coming back, as can taking potassium citrate. But many can't tolerate potassium citrate, which can cause gastrointestinal side effects. They may try to get more citrate from their diet - and one obvious source is citrus juices, like lemon, grapefruit and orange. Read more

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01/22/2010 - News
Diet is a factor in kidney stones

Diet is a factor in kidney stones

Reducing calcium in the diet does not help prevent the return of kidney stones, say Italian researchers. Read more

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01/11/2010 - News
10/27/2009 - News

Dialysis Found to Increase Disability

Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may become dependent upon dialysis. It is not clear whether patients are able to maintain their same level of independence after initiation of dialysis treatment. In the October 15, 2009 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, a new study indicates that, among nursing home residents with ESRD, the initiation of dialysis is associated with a significant and lasting decline in functional status. Read more

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09/10/2009 - News

Men need not put up with overactive bladder

There are many ways of dealing with the problem of an overactive bladder, say urology experts. Read more

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08/28/2009 - News

Bladder does not shrink as you get older

Contrary to popular belief, the bladder does not get smaller with age although this perception may be part of an underlying urinary condition. Read more

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08/28/2009 - News

Overactive bladder treatment given all clear

A new study shows that a treatment for overactive bladder does not have an adverse effect on cognition. Read more

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06/25/2009 - News

Weight Loss Seems to Reduce Urinary Incontinence

Obesity is an established risk factor for the development of urinary incontinence, but it is not conclusively known if weight loss has a beneficial effect in decreasing the frequency of urinary leakage. According to a study published in the January 29, 2009 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, an intensive 6-month weight loss program seems to reduce urinary incontinence . Read more

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