Articles on Bladder and Kidney Problems

Bladder problems encompass a wide range of disorders, some of which cause pain, urinary incontinence or other complications that affect quality of life.  Problems in the urinary system can be caused by aging, illness or injury.  As a person gets older, changes in the kidneys’ structure cause them to lose some of their ability to remove wastes from the blood.  Also, the muscles in the ureters, bladder and urethra tend to lose some of their strength.  Urinary infections often occur because the bladder muscles do not tighten enough to empty the bladder completely.  A decrease in the strength of the muscles of the sphincters and the pelvis can cause incontinence (unwanted leakage of urine).

Illness or injury can also prevent the kidneys from filtering the blood completely or block the passage of urine.  The main cause of impaired kidney (renal) function is diabetes. It can lead to acute, chronic or end-stage renal failure.  Other renal conditions include kidney infections, kidney stones, nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and polycystic kidney disease.
 

05/20/2010 - Articles

Cancer risk for kidney transplant recipients is independent of immunosuppressant

Kidney transplant can be a lifesaving operation but it is not without long-term health risks.  In particular, those who have had a kidney transplant are more likely to develop cancer in the years after their operation.  The increased risk of cancer after a kidney transplant has been linked to the need to take immunosuppressant medication.  These drugs, as the name suggests, suppress immunity which therefore prevents rejection of the new kidney.  But the immune system plays an important role in protecting the body against cancer.  If it is suppressed then cancer is more likely. Read more

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05/20/2010 - Articles

Protein in urine a risk for those with high blood pressure

People with high blood pressure are at increased risk of both kidney problems and heart disease. We already know that excreting a slight excess of protein in the urine (microalbuminuria) is linked to an increased risk of kidney and heart disease in people with both diabetes and high blood pressure. In the MAGIC (Microalbuminuria: A Genoa Investigation on Complications) study, a team at the University of Genoa, Italy, now reveals that microalbuminuria is also a risk factor for people without diabetes who have high blood pressure. Read more

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02/01/2010 - Articles

Acute kidney injury in hospital increases mortality later on

Acute kidney injury previously also known as acute renal failure) is a sudden loss of kidney function. While it’s entirely possible to recover from acute kidney injury in the short term, a new study shows that it may have long-term consequences for the patient. Researchers from the Center for health Quality, Outcomes, and Economic Research, Bedford, USA, looked at a Veterans Affairs database to see what impact acute kidney injury during hospitalization had upon a group of 83,000 patients. More than half of patients with acute kidney injury will need dialysis to replace their kidney function. Also, many of them do die before they leave hospital. In this study, the focus was upon those patients who did not need dialysis and who survived for at least three months following their discharge from hospital. In other words, these patients had seemingly recovered from their acute kidney injury. Read more

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01/29/2010 - Articles

Blood pressure monitoring may interfere with sleep

Blood pressure monitoring over 24 hours may give a clearer indication of whether someone has hypertension than single measurements made in the doctor’s office. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, can cause or worsen kidney disease and is also a risk factor for heart disease or stroke. So it is important to diagnose it accurately which is where blood pressure monitoring comes in. Normally, blood pressure falls at night because someone is usually asleep (less active). Blood pressure monitoring can detect this ‘dip’ at night and its absence is often a sign of hypertension. Read more

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01/20/2010 - Articles
Why green tea can help prevent kidney stones

Why green tea can help prevent kidney stones

Green tea is credited with a number of health benefits. The latest finding on green tea is that it might be able to prevent kidney stones. Read more

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12/23/2009 - Articles

Can one prevent incontinence ?

Incontinence is not only a distressing and embarrassing condition, it is also the cause of considerable expenses in elderly care. Read more

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12/22/2009 - Articles
Can Your Diet Prevent a Urinary Tract Infection?

Can Your Diet Prevent a Urinary Tract Infection?

It appears that a diet high in berry juice (such as cranberry) and fermented milk products (such as yogurt), may offer some protection against urinary tract infections (UTIs). Read more

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10/26/2009 - Articles
Prevent kidney stones

Prevent kidney stones: Preventing kidney stones through a healthy diet

Kidney Stones, how to prevent kidney stones through a health diet? Kidney stones are from through accumulation of salts in the urinary system. Having a kidney stone can be extremely painful but new research now suggests that a healthy diet can help avoid developing one. Read more

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10/23/2009 - Articles

Chronic kidney disease outlook improves with exercise

Chronic kidney disease is often associated with other health problems, like diabetes, obesity and heart disease.  Those with chronic kidney disease often die prematurely, although not necessarily from a kidney problem.  It’s therefore of interest to look at whether a healthy lifestyle might help those with chronic kidney disease by improving their other health problems. Read more

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09/28/2009 - Articles

Kidney disease helped by weight loss

Kidney disease is common and those affected by it may need dialysis to cleanse their blood or even a kidney transplant in the final stages of the disease.  Kidney disease is a known complication of diabetes.  Therefore, there is a suspicion that maybe some of the diabetes risk factors, like overweight, could also be implicated in kidney disease.  But, till now, it has not been clear what impact overweight and obesity have in kidney disease. Read more

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