News on Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a bone disease that leads to an increased risk of fracture. Osteoporosis is most common in women after menopause, but may also develop in men, and may occur in anyone in the presence of certain hormonal disorders, other chronic diseases or as a result of medications.

Osteoporosis can be prevented with lifestyle changes and sometimes medication. Lifestyle changes include regular exercise and learning to prevent falls. Exercise has an anabolic effect which may stop or reverse osteoporosis. Fall-prevention advice includes exercise to tone deambulatory muscles, proprioception-improvement exercises and equilibrium therapies. Some common medications include calcium, vitamin D, bisphosphonates and several others.

08/19/2010 - News

Boost Your Bone Health

More than 25 million adults in the United States either have or are at risk for osteoporosis, a condition characterized by fragile bones that significa Read more

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12/23/2009 - News

Osteoporosis drug might help in osteoarthritis too

  Osteoporosis drug might help in osteoarthritis too Read more

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12/23/2009 - News

Cancer of the Esophagus Reported in Patients Taking Osteoporosis Drugs

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reported 23 cases of esophageal cancer in patients taking oral bisphosphonate drugs, namely alendronate (marketed as Fosamax®), fo Read more

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12/22/2009 - News

Calcium from Food is Better than Supplements

Many women, mindful of their risk of developing osteoporosis, take calcium supplements. I know my wife does. Yet a new study, reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggests there may be a better way of getting the same protection - eating calcium-rich foods. Read more

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12/21/2009 - News

Hip Protectors Don't Work As Intended

  Hip Protectors Don't Work As Intended Read more

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12/21/2009 - News

Diabetic Women Experience More Hip Bone Loss at Menopause

Although women with diabetes have higher levels of bone mineral density prior to menopause, they experience a significantly greater rate of bone loss at the hip at menopause compared to women without diabetes, according to a study presented at the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 31st Annual Meeting. However, bone loss in the spine seems to be slower in people with diabetes than in non-diabetics. Read more

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09/23/2009 - News

Vitamin D and Calcium Lower Mortality Risk

Hip fractures occur frequently in older individuals and lead to substantial morbidity and mortality. Higher doses of vitamin D reduce the risk of fracture. According to a study presented at the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 31st Annual Meeting, vitamin D and calcium contribute to lower risk of death among older people, and these benefits are not necessarily due to a reduced risk of hip fracture and fracture-related complications. Read more

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08/27/2009 - News

Denosumab Reduces Fracture Risk in Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and brittle, increasing the risk that mild stresses like bending over or coughing can cause a fracture. Fractures from osteoporosis are about twice as common in women as they are in men. In the August 20, 2009 issue of New England Journal of Medicine, scientists report that treatment with denosumab reduces the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fractures in women with osteoporosis. Read more

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06/30/2009 - News

Diabetes Drugs May Increase Hip Fractures

Perhaps you've already heard that the diabetes drugs rosiglitazone (marketed as Avandia®) and pioglitazone (marketed as Actos®) have been linked to an increased risk of heart failure and may increase the risk of bone fractures in patients with type 2 diabetes. Read more

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06/30/2009 - News

Calcium Supplements Can Have a Downside ...

It seems that healthy postmenopausal women who take a calcium citrate supplement may have an increased risk of heart attack (myocardial infarct, or MI). This news comes from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, reporting in the British Medical Journal online. Read more

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