News on Cholesterol

Cholesterol is one of the many substances created and used by our bodies to keep us healthy.  Some of the cholesterol we need is produced naturally (and can be affected by hereditary factors), and some of it comes from the food we eat.  There are two types of cholesterol — “good” and “bad.”  It’s important to understand the difference, and to know the levels of good and bad cholesterol in your blood.  Too much of one type or not enough of the other can put you at risk for coronary heart disease, heart attack or stroke.

 

05/20/2010 - News

Eating Nuts Lowers Lipid Levels

Consumption of nearly any type of nuts improves lipid levels in the blood, according to a new study published in the May 11, 2010 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. The lipid-lowering effect of nuts lowers total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and may lower coronary heart disease risk.  Read more

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05/03/2010 - News

Statins Do Not Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk

Although some studies have suggested a possible benefit for statin therapy in reducing the risk of a colorectal cancer in some individuals, a new study published online in the journal Cancer Prevention Research adds to the growing body of evidence that finds statins to not be protective against colorectal cancer. Read more

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04/15/2010 - News

Obese Patients Just as Likely to Receive Preventive Care

People who are overweight or obese often fear that healthcare providers are biased because of their weight. And, clinicians often express dissatisfaction in caring for obese patients. In combination, these observations raise potential concerns that obese patients might receive lower quality of medical care. However, according to a new study published in the April 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, obese patients are no less likely to receive recommended preventive care than other patients. Read more

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04/12/2010 - News

Effect of Soy on Cholesterol After Menopause

Soy has been touted to have benefits in cancer prevention and heart disease. However, new research published online in the journal Menopause reveals that eating extra soy for one year does not reduce cholesterol in postmenopausal women. Read more

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03/22/2010 - News

High-Dose Simvastatin Increases Risk of Muscle Injury

On March 19, 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an alert indicating that using simvastatin (marketed as Zocor®) at the highest approved dose is associated with an increased risk for myopathy, a muscular disease that results in muscle weakness. Simvastatin is a commonly –prescribed medication used for lowering cholesterol. Read more

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12/21/2009 - News

Statins may reduce cataract risk

  Statins may reduce cataract risk Read more

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11/20/2009 - News

Niacin Found to Be Better than Zetia for High Cholesterol

Niacin, a form of vitamin B, is superior to ezetimibe, or Zetia, for boosting good cholesterol, according to a study published online November 15, 2009 in The New England Journal of Medicine. Although Zetia is effective at reducing LDL, otherwise known as ‘bad cholesterol’, it seems that niacin is the better drug for high-risk patients who need to add a second cholesterol-lowering medication to their statin therapy. Read more

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09/14/2009 - News

High Cholesterol Linked to Risk for Alzheimer’s

 Elevated levels of cholesterol in middle age are strongly associated with the risk for Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, according to new research published online August 4, 2009 in the journal Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders. Read more

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09/09/2009 - News

Combination Lipid Therapy No Better Than Statins

Cholesterol-lowering therapy with statins effectively prevents cardiovascular disease, but treatment with statins does not guarantee that cholesterol targets are reached. In cases where intensive lipid-lowering is needed, physicians sometimes combine statins with other lipid-modifying medications. However, according to a review published online before print September 1, 2009 in Annals of Internal Medicine, limited evidence suggests that combinations of lipid-lowering agents do not improve clinical outcomes more than high-dose statins alone. Read more

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08/13/2009 - News

FDA Approves New Cholesterol Drug

Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pitavastatin, a new cholesterol-lowering drug. Pitavastatin is indicated for the primary treatment of high cholesterol and combined dyslipidemia. Read more

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